Don’t let mosquitoes suck the fun out of your Summer


Now that summer is here, more and more insects are buzzing around. There’s nothing worse than coming home from a nice hike and realizing that you’ve been an unsuspecting feast for the mosquitoes. Not only are mosquito bites annoying and irritating, but mosquitoes spread viruses and disease. There are things that you can do to be less attractive to mosquitoes, such as wearing lighter clothing (they are attracted to darker colours), drying off your sweat, and making sure not to get too warm (they are attracted to the scent of sweat and body heat).

 

Find below my solution to Mosquitoes !

 

BOUNCE! SHEETS

I was told by a few people that Bounce! dryer sheets are good at keeping mosquitoes away. A friend said that he had been told by a park ranger that they were her go-to solution – she would just tie a sheet to her shirt and off she’d go. I was quite excited about this since those sheets are quite cheap and the scent lasts for a long time so you wouldn’t have to change them everyday, and they must be less toxic than harsh insect repellents. I tested this method out on a few summer nights out on the water though and I’m sad to say this did not work for me in the slightest. If you have some of these lying around though it doesn’t hurt to give it a shot – let us know how it works for you!

VITAMIN B PILLS

This is the solution I settled on after deciding that I was too cheap to buy the Insect Defend Patch, considering that if you are going to be outdoors a lot in the summer you will have to replace the patch every day. Since the main ingredient is Vitamin B1, I just went out and bought a bottle of Vitamin B1 pills. Note, however, that you cannot simply take a whole bunch of B1’s and hope that they seep through your pores. Your body can’t absorb enough B1 for you to emit enough to keep bugs away, and will probably just pass out what isn’t needed. Not to mention the fact that you probably shouldn’t take more than the recommended dosage. You would also have to wait for it to pass through your system before it was effective, if it was at all.

What I did was take about 3 B1 tablets, crush them (or you could buy pills and open them and take out the powder) and mix it in about a cup of water. Not all of the pills dissolved so you could probably get away with less, but I wanted to make sure to saturate the solution for maximum effect. Then I just put it in a spray bottle, and sprayed liberally all over my skin, rubbed in a bit and let dry.

This method really worked. You will definitely smell like Vitamin B1 pills, but it’s really cost effective (3 pills lasted me all summer), and I had no qualms about rubbing it all over, including my face and on children, unlike other dangerous chemical based repellents. It will also start working as soon as it’s been applied. This method worked so well for me that I have stopped trying all other methods. Make sure to reapply though if you have been sweating lots or go swimming.

Glamp Fires, the s’more the merrier!


Glamping  and camping don’t exist without a fire. No better place to drink that cold one and gather with your friends!

 

To unwind at the end of a relaxing Glamping day, nothing better then the warmth of a fire

There’s nothing like the sweet smell of marshmallows toasting over an open fire, or hot dogs roasting on a stick. But, when cooking and camping, campfire safety is of utmost importance.

So, before you get dinner started, you need to be sure you’re not just enjoying a gourmet meal, but staying safe while you do. Here are five simple fire safety tips for your next glamping adventure.

 

Step 1: Look Up and Around

Campfire safety starts well before the fire gets roaring. When scouting out your fire pit, make sure it’s not under any low hanging branches or near brush or bushes. These can easily go up in flames if the fire gets bigger than anticipated.

You should also keep an 8 to 10 foot radius clear of anything, including tents, chairs and food.

 

Step 2: Safety Proof Your Pit

While most campgrounds have a pit already dug out, it’s not always ready to go when it comes time for your first fire. Depending on who was there before, there may be some additional safety measures to take.

  • Clear all debris from around the fire pit, including garbage and grass. There should be a 5-foot perimeter of soil around the campfire space.
  • If there is no metal ring, circle the pit with rocks. If your fire grows in size, this will help keep it within these borders.
  • Keep any flammable items far from the fire. This includes aerosol cans and pressurized containers.

If you ever have any questions, you can always call over your campground ranger. Campfire safety is their number one priority, and rangers can double check whether the pit is ready to use or not. It’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Step 3: Have Water Nearby

A big gust of wind or new piece of wood could cause your fire to grow larger than anticipated. In that case, you want to always have water, dirt or a shovel nearby to help reduce the flames or put it out completely if necessary. Controlling the fire can be just as important as putting it out.

 

Step 4: Always Watch

Whether you’re camping alone, with friends or your whole family, it’s easy to get distracted and walk away from the fire. Regardless of what is going on, make sure someone always has an eye on the fire. Especially keep an eye on pets and children that may be sitting or walking close by.

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Part of keeping an eye on the growing flames is ensuring that it’s built properly from the start. This allows it to develop at a safe and controllable rate.

  • Start the fire with kindling and put the wood in a teepee shape around that. Add larger, dry pieces as it grows.
  • Avoid using flammable liquids. This can quickly and easily get out of hand.

 

Step 5: Extinguish Before Bed

When it’s time to retire to bed, you need to put out the fire. There are a number of ways you can do this; throwing water or dirt on the fire is always the best option. Afterward, stir the embers around to ensure another fire won’t start. Ideally, the coals should be wet and cold.

Most campers will agree: camping just isn’t the same without a campfire. However, a great weekend is quickly ruined if someone is hurt or something catches flame. Keep campfire safety in mind, and the fun will surely ensue.